NAVITIME Travel - Japan Travel Guides, Transit Search and Itinerary Planner

Where to go in Tsukiji

Although it's the main reason most tourists flock here, there's a lot more to Tsukiji than just its market. This busy but welcoming traditional corner of Tokyo is home to sacred sites, stylish cafes, and all the kitchenware outlets you could imagine. There's so much to explore, but here's where to start!

Where to go in Tsukiji

CONTENTS

  • Tsukiji Honganji for something different

  • Matcha Stand Maruni Tokyo Tsukiji for a little pick me up

  • Tsukij Masamoto for your blade needs

  • Ichifuji for ceramics

  • Tsukiji Namiyoke Jinjya for a little peace

  • Tsukiji Honganji for something different

    Tsukiji Honganji for something different

    Tsukiji Honganji for something different

    If you spend a little time wandering the streets of Tsukiji chances are you’ll pass by Tsukiji Honganji, arguably inner-Tokyo's most unique Buddhist temple. Rebuilt after a fire between 1931 and 1934 its domed roof and large archways, Tsukiji Honganji looks more like an Indian Palace than a traditional Japanese temple. A lot more contemporary than the city’s other religious hubs, Tsukiji Honganji is also famous for being the memorial site and resting place of X-Japan musician and J-Rock legend Hide (Hideto Matsumoto) whose funeral ceremony was held here in 1998.

    Tsukiji Hongwanji
    Address
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Tsukiji 3-15-1
    Phone
    0335411131
  • Matcha Stand Maruni Tokyo Tsukiji for a little pick me up

    Matcha Stand Maruni Tokyo Tsukiji for a little pick me up

    Matcha Stand Maruni Tokyo Tsukiji for a little pick me up

    A very new addition to Tsukiji’s local culinary community, Matcha Stand Maruni Tokyo Tsukiji opened late this year but is already quickly gaining popularity as a favorite local hangout. Design wise the cafe is a hybrid of a modern coffee shop crossed with classical tea house style interiors. Bringing old-world Japanese charm into a modern everyday setting, Matcha Stand Maruni make their photogenic matcha lattes by using traditional tea ceremony methods. If you’ve wanted to enjoy matcha tea but can’t quite handle the original drink’s bitterness, or want a little afternoon pick me up, pop by to grab a latte to go. Also, don’t worry if you’re a bit nervous about your Japanese skills, most of the staff speak English

  • Tsukij Masamoto for your blade needs

    Tsukij Masamoto for your blade needs

    Tsukij Masamoto for your blade needs

    There are not many things more important to Japan’s world-class chefs than the perfect knife, and Tsukiji Masamoto is where some of the best in the business head. Founded in the late Edo period, the team here have been perfecting the art of knife making for almost 150 years. A family run business the figure behind the counter is the shop’s 6th-generation owner, a man with world-class intel on all things knife-related. If you’re on the hunt for something really special, the store also makes custom blades to order which can be shipped to your home.

    Tsukiji shohon honsha
    Address
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Tsukiji 4-9-9
    Phone
    0335418000
  • Ichifuji for ceramics

    Ichifuji for ceramics

    Ichifuji for ceramics

    For some one-of-a-kind Japanese gifts, put aside to explore the shelves of Ichifuji, a store that’s practically overflowing with ceramics, lacquer-ware, and other tableware items from across the country. Featuring Arita-yaki from Saga prefecture, Mino-yaki from Gifu, and Echizen-Nuri made in Fukui, Ichifuji is home to over 20,000 pieces, so no matter what you’re looking for there’s a good chance you’ll find it here. Although the store mainly caters to businesses (hotels like restaurants) it is open to the public too.

    Ichifuji
    Address
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Tsukiji 4-14-14
    Phone
    0335421855
  • Tsukiji Namiyoke Jinjya for a little peace

    Tsukiji Namiyoke Jinjya for a little peace

    Tsukiji Namiyoke Jinjya for a little peace

    Nestled right beside Tsukiji Market you’ll find an unintentionally hidden spiritual retreat. The small Shinto shrine Tsukiji Namiyoke Inari-jinja is in part dedicated to the power of the sea. As the legend goes, in 1659 Tsukiji was built on reclaimed land, however, while the construction was happening, the rough waves prevented the ground from settling. Locals prayed to the deity Ukanomitama-no-Mikoto, and the waves ceased. Today you'll find the shrine is home to two large lions heads that represent one male (“Tenjo Ojishi”) and one female (“Ohaguro Shishi”). If you need a little break for the at times manic energy of the market, this is an excellent place to visit.

    Tsukiji Namiyoke Jinja shrine
    Address
    Tokyo Chuou-ku Tsukiji 6-20-37
    Phone
    0335418451
  • Facebookでシェアする
  • Twitterでシェアする

Recommended new articles