NAVITIME Travel - Japan Travel Guides, Transit Search and Itinerary Planner

How to Enjoy Fireworks Festivals in Japan

From early summer to mid-autumn, there are more than a thousand fireworks festivals held across Japan: it is often said that there is a fireworks event every day of the year between July and August. A quintessential Japanese experience, the summer hanabi festival brings together the community to drink and make merry with a fireworks closer. Here are a few tips to make the experience as smooth as possible, although it’s important to remember than the rules of engagement can be a bit different at the showpiece events in major cities.

  • Get equipped

    Get equipped

    Get equipped

    Before heading out, make sure you’re ready for the long haul. Grab one of the ubiquitous blue tarps (check a home store, the second floor of a grocery store, and even some convenience stores) that also make an appearance during cherry blossom season, and maybe some bug spray and suntan lotion. It doesn’t hurt to pack a few drinks and snacks, too, but be sure to check the regulations of wherever you’re heading as some parks frown on public drinking. Make sure your phone or camera are fully charged, so you don’t run out of batteries before the fireworks flash.

  • Stake out a good spot

    Stake out a good spot

    Stake out a good spot

    The best bet is to go with the flow. The locals will know what the best spots are and what areas will afford the best views of the fireworks. Things can get very busy at the larger festivals, so be respectful of your neighbors’ space. It doesn’t hurt to exchange a greeting—make some fireworks buddies! Remember though, at larger festivals, the best viewing spots are reserved for ticket holders. The fireworks will be just as pretty a bit further back and it will make things easier when it’s time to head out.

  • Grab a bite to eat

    Grab a bite to eat

    Grab a bite to eat

    Hanabi festivals have all of the street food favorites: chocolate-covered bananas, okonomiyaki, takoyaki, taiyaki, and all manner of things deep fried and stuck on sticks. The acres of vendors are one of the major attractions at any summer festival. The snacks might not be particularly healthy but they go great with an ice cold beer or a bottle of cold oolong tea.

  • Settle in

    Settle in

    Settle in

    Make sure you’re in place before the fireworks begin. Things usually get underway after dusk, when the sky is dark—that means that the hanabi will get started quite late in the evening. Precise times are usually published before the event. Get comfortable because coming and going can be difficult once everyone else has gotten into place.

  • Snap a photo and get home safe

    Snap a photo and get home safe

    Snap a photo and get home safe

    Once everything is done, the best bet is to take your time leaving the area. The crowds leaving the area can be a bit intense and riding buses and subways can be next to impossible. Make alternate plans. Walk, if you can, or, better yet, find a local izakaya or restaurant to keep the party going and plan your Instagram stories. Once the crowds have thinned out, it’s time to head back to home base.

    Kawaguchikokojosai
    Address
    Yamanashi Pref. Minami-tsuru County Fujikawaguchiko Town Funatsu4034
    Phone
    0555722460
  • Facebookでシェアする
  • Twitterでシェアする

Recommended new articles